Excerpt from “Home for a While”

As ranches across the Sandhills consolidate, we risk losing that land’s greatest caretakers.

Shadbolt revels in the quiet that her ranching life offers and takes pride in knowing that her dream of owning land has been met. (Photo by Lauren Justice)

Shadbolt revels in the quiet that her ranching life offers and takes pride in knowing that her dream of owning land has been met. (Photo by Lauren Justice)

BY JACOB ZLOMKE for Fly Over Media | THE NEW TERRITORY ISSUE 01

There are no mailboxes or house numbers out in the hills.

No places for Google Maps to find, so directions are based on landmarks — windmills, small bridges, gates in the endless barbed wire fences.

Sherill Shadbolt doesn’t let on a hint of embarrassment or apology when she tells us that to get to her ranch, we’ll have to turn onto Shadbolt Road, which essentially serves as a long, winding and bumpy dirt driveway to her house. That her family began ranching this land is probably the reason for the road in the first place.

Home for a While, to be published later this year, is the book component of Fly Over Me, a multimedia documentary project about rural communities in the Nebraska and South Dakota sandhills. Fly Over Me is produced by the non-profit Fly Over Media. flyovermedia.org


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