Growing Up Hungry

Chronic childhood hunger leads to higher rates of mental health concerns and behaviors such as poor self-control.

BY LENZY KREHBIEL-BURTON | THE NEW TERRITORY ISSUE 01
for the Native Health News Alliance
With multiple studies showing chronic hunger's prolonged impact on mental health in both children and adults, regular access to eggs and other nutrient-rich foods can lessen the risk of depression and anxiety. (Courtesy Photo)

With multiple studies showing chronic hunger’s prolonged impact on mental health in both children and adults, regular access to eggs and other nutrient-rich foods can lessen the risk of depression and anxiety. (Courtesy Photo)

Keep the commodity cheese away from Fawn White, thanks.

“I hate commod cheese,” she said. “I despise it when I hear people say, ‘Oh, I love that cheese!’ Well buddy, you didn’t grow up on that cheese.”

With American Indian and Alaska Natives more likely to struggle with regular access to food, that cheese, distributed through an assistance program offered by the U.S. Department of Agriculture, is a regular sight in many Native houses, including White’s childhood home in rural north-central Oklahoma. It has also left a lasting imprint on thousands of palettes and psyches.

 


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ISSUE 01 MADE POSSIBLE BY OUR SPONSORS

Native Health News Alliance  Missouri Wildflowers Nursery

The Red Earth MFA at Oklahoma City University

 

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